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God creates a new heart in you when you accept His Son. Indwelled with the Holy Spirit, the Son and the Father, one's bitterness begins to dissipate as we put off the old man and put on the new man ().

God creates a new heart in you when you accept His Son (Ezekiel 36:26). Indwelled with the Holy Spirit, the Son and the Father, one’s bitterness begins to dissipate as we put off the old man and put on the new man (John 14:17; 15:4, 1 Cor 14:25).

How often have we come into a situation already having made our decision. We walk into a discussion or circumstance already settled confident in our own understanding. Since the only truth is in scripture, we are probably better served settling only there dogmatically. Then is not you, but the scripture that judges. When you tell them Jesus is the only way to God you can quote John 14:6,

“Jesus saith unto him, “I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.””

The Christian is not being exclusive, Jesus the very Son of God himself makes this emphatic.

Use this approach as exclusively as possible. The down side is that the law (God’s word) judges mankind, it does not save mankind (Rom 2:12; 3:28).   Therefore, many will not want to hear those truths. Truth can create bitterness, certainly rebellion. When we judge others improperly (Matthew 7:1-2) and are called out on it (Matthew 18:15) more often than not there is bitterness in one or the other heart.

This bitterness, jealousy and lust for power lived in the hearts of the leaders in Israel in the first century. They acted in all ways from this wicked heart. You can make a very good argument that they did not even know how wicked they were. They just wanted to run Israel and include God and thought that was at least acceptable under Roman rule. They were in captivity after all and just trying to make the best of it. Jesus was stirring things up and His preaching was creating division. They could not see that they were why Jesus had to come. The leaders saw themselves as the answer, they were the elite, they were the Chief Priests.

How many today see themselves, their policies, their leadership, their charisma or their power as the way to correct our ills as a nation, as a people even spiritually. How many believe in themselves to the extent they demand complete devotion from their subordinates. When something goes wrong, those people are embittered. God’s will is often not coincident with ours. We are the ones who need to bend, not Him.